NAGC Blog

Well, it’s the most wonderful time of the year here in Washington, DC! No, not the holiday season, but budget season! For those keeping track at home, the Federal Government has been operating on a continuing resolution since September 1, 2021--the end of the fiscal year for the government--and like the status of most of my library books as a kid, a new federal budget has been long overdue. For gifted advocates, now is a good time to speak up to make a difference.
Ann Fabe Isaacs, the founder of NAGC, was a passionate supporter of gifted children and a highly effective leader. She started and ran two non-profit organizations, raised a family, painted, and wrote music.
During my time as a psychiatrist helping advanced students, much of the work was addressing a hope for recognition — a desire to be seen and understood by others. Not recognition for achievements, though that was welcomed, but recognition as persons with legitimate claims to valued societal membership. In my view, this desire for recognition arises from what seem to be the two truly universal human characteristics. Responding to the needs for recognition of indigenous students and students of color, referred to by the shorthand phrase BIPOC, is an essential task.
As Black History Month comes to a close, we want to continue to recognize the contributions of Black leaders in the field of gifted & talented education. Today, we are sharing this post originally written in 2016 on Dr. Martin D. Jenkins, one of the first to study giftedness in Black students.
Black History is an often overlook part of American History, but Black History Month is the time we focus on the accomplishments, history, and joy of African Americans. One way to integrate Black history and the experiences of African Americans into the curriculum is with books. The following is a list of recently published books that will inspire, delight, and increase students’ knowledge about the many and varied experiences of African Americans since 1619.

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