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Register for Parent Day at the National

Thursday, November 15
8:00 am - 2:15 pm

Gifted Education Applications: Critical Issues and Models for Delivering Successful Programs and Services

Separate Registration Required | $139 (includes lunch)

Choose from topics designed to offer a more specialized approach to gifted education applications in your area of expertise. Whether you are an administrator or experienced gifted coordinator, you’re sure to find something to increase your knowledge and advance your understanding!

Who Should Attend?

Any educator with more than three years’ experience working in gifted and talented education—administrators, gifted coordinators, counselors, classroom teachers

Schedule

8:00 – 9:00 am
Opening General Session
State of the Nation in Gifted Education
Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL; Nancy Green, NAGC, Washington, DC

Opening General Session

Gifted Leading the Way:  National Priorities and Opportunities for Action

Whatever your role in education, information about the national picture can make you more effective. What are the major national issues facing gifted education?  How does NAGC plan to play a role? Attend to hear compelling findings from a “National Summit on Low-Income, High-Ability Learners,” that focus on both a research and practice agenda for the field.  You’ll also come away with a new understanding of NAGC’s advocacy priorities and the tools you can use in your own environment to make the case for gifted education.

 Thursday’s topics have been identified as critical by leaders in gifted education. In order to tailor your experience, please choose one breakout session that best meets your needs in each of the two time slots.


9:15 – 11:00 am
Morning Breakout Sessions  (Choose One when Registering)

T1. G/T Coordinator Support: Learn, Share, and Problem Solve Together
Virginia Burney, Kristie Speirs Neumeister, Ball State University, Muncie, IN

GT Program Administrators or Coordinators have a uniquely challenging job. They must be able to explain and defend and educate others about what, why, and how to identify and serve gifted students. They need to understand laws, rules, policies, guidelines, procedures, and budgets. They need psychometric, leadership, and curriculum knowledge and skills to be able to work with the range of K-12 teachers and administrators. This session shares best practices in the core areas of GT programming including identification, services, and program effectiveness and provides opportunities to network and problem solve with others who share similar challenges.

T2. Supporting Peak Performance 24/7: Creating Standards-Based Talent Development Programs in Your District
Lauri Kirsch, Christie Ray, Hillsborough County Public Schools, Tampa, FL

While most districts focus on providing gifted programming within the parameters of the school day, the need for talent development opportunities extends beyond the confines of the school calendar. How has one district looked at students’ abilities, needs, and interests to provide self-supporting talent development opportunities beyond the school day and beyond the school year? Attend this session and learn about one district’s model for providing challenging academically-oriented enrichment programs through live and virtual options. Come with curiosity and leave with ideas and resources for expanding programming for gifted and talented students in your district!

T3. Digital Storytelling: Narratives for the 21st Century
Kristen Stephens, Susan Wynn, Duke University, Durham, NC

Today’s students are accustomed to creating, consuming, and sharing information using an array of technologies. Digital storytelling is one method that can be used in the classroom that blends writing, technology, and emotion—addressing both the cognitive and affective domains. Joining personal narratives with images, video, voiceover, soundtrack, and effects, digital stories demonstrate what learning should look like in the 21st century. Participants will be guided through the 7 elements of a digital story and begin writing their own stories. Without a doubt, digital storytelling will bring out the artist, the storyteller, the techie, and the writer in you and your students!

T5. Preparing Gifted Hispanic/Latino Students to be Successful Citizens of the World: What We Can Do to Help Them Now and In The Future
Jaime Castellano, Ganado Unified School District, Ganado, AZ

Why is it important for our country’s best and brightest Hispanic/ Latino students to participate in advanced academic programs like gifted education, honors, Advanced Placement, and International Baccalaureate? Perhaps your insights in answering this question inform classroom practices and supervisory or administrative behaviors, attitudes, and perceptions. In part, this session will focus on the adult variable of the gifted education equation, inviting participants to engage in reflection, to think critically, and to collaborate and communicate with each other in how they are invested in serving this unique subgroup. It will also address programmatic changes in practices that will help prepare our gifted Hispanic/Latino students to be successful.

T6. Developing Talent in the STEM Fields in the Era of the Common Core State Standards (morning session focuses on grades K-5)
Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are critical to our position as a global leader. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) stress rigor, depth, clarity, and coherence, but fall short of meeting the needs of gifted and talented students. In this session, participants will explore the CCSS in elementary mathematics and research-based strategies, innovation, curriculum, and resources for serving diverse, promising STEM students. Participants will choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate approaches to support and develop K-5 STEM students, and discuss current issues and implications of national initiatives with STEM experts.

T7. Best Practices in Developing Online Classes for Gifted Students
Elfi Sanderson, Amy Gyarmathy, Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, NorthwesternUniversity, Evanston, IL

With the explosion of K-12 online learning programs, there are myriad models from which to choose. This new venue holds great promise for gifted students providing greater access to academically rigorous curriculum, intellectual peers, and 21st century skills. What factors must be taken into consideration when creating or selecting high quality online courses? This session will discuss the needs of the online gifted learner, the appropriate delivery of online content and the use of the best available technology based on iNACOL’s National Standards for Quality Teaching and NAGC gifted programming standards.

T8. Untethered Learning Through the Use of Technology and Curricular Design
Kristina Ayers Paul, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Jann Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Jennifer Troester, O’Neill Public Schools, O’Neill, NE

Educators and administrators in gifted education face the challenge of providing learning experiences for students and teachers who are stationed throughout a building, district, or even region. Several technology tools, when married with principles of sound instructional design, can untether learning opportunities from the obstacles of place and time. In this two-part session we will introduce technology solutions for providing educational experiences at a distance, discuss the principles of instructional design that must be considered when designing technology-based learning, and provide time for guided practice using one or more of the tools discussed.

T9. Beyond the Core: Infusing Critical and Creative Thinking into the Curriculum
Susan Dulong Langley, Framingham Public Schools, Framingham, MA

The Common Core State Standards developers acknowledge that the Standards do not define the intervention methods or materials necessary to support students who are well above grade-level expectations, and state that the Standards are a call to take the next step. What, then, is the next step? We will explore strategies in curriculum and lesson design to support: Establishing essential elements; developing pre-formative and summative assessments to inform instruction; tiering by cognitive complexity; and infusing creative-thinking skills.

T10. Secondary Programs for Advanced Learners: Effective Models & Services
Richard Cash, Bloomington Public Schools, Bloomington, MN

Services for advanced secondary students are often limited to honors courses, Advanced Placement (AP) and/or International Baccalaureate (IB) programs, which are not specifically differentiated to meet the needs of gifted adolescents. Well-rounded programs and services for secondary gifted learners nurture under-represented students, provide sophisticated academics and offer exacting guidance in unique social/emotional development. Participants will learn the range of services and programming options and how they can be effectively implemented at the secondary level (grades 6-12).

T11. Gifted Education Programming: A Sherpa for Guiding Everyone to New Heights NEW TIME
Sally Krisel, Hall County Schools, Gainesville, GA

Refusing to focus on “adequacy” or take a deficiency view of children from diverse backgrounds, Hall County (GA) educators have chosen a pull-from-the-top approach to achievement. Systematically and collaboratively, they are developing challenging programs with their roots in gifted education that allow teachers to recognize and develop gifts and talents in students from diverse populations. Discussion includes highly personalized programming options, use of innovative technologies to add depth and complexity to curriculum, and a districtwide reconceptualization of Response to Intervention. Come learn about this counter-intuitive approach and start identifying potential Sherpa guides for your school or school system.


Networking Lunch
11:15 am – 12:15 pm


Afternoon Sessions
12:30 – 2:15 pm (Choose one when registering)

T4. Early Entrance Programs for Young Gifted Children: Preparing for Four Year-Olds in Kindergarten NEW TIME

Kimberley Chandler, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA; Melinda Ness, Littleton Public Schools, Littleton, CO

Early entrance into kindergarten and first grade for highly gifted children is a new trend in many districts. Student success in these programs is contingent on superior levels of academic, social, and emotional proficiency. Presenters will share the research supporting early entrance as well as information about possible pitfalls and will delineate the components for planning a thriving program, including screening and identification procedures, changes needed in the K-1 classrooms to support these learners, professional development requirements, and classroom curricular and environmental needs. Participants will receive a planning guide for developing their own early entrance programs.

T12. Developing Talent in the STEM Fields in the Era of the Common Core State Standards (afternoon session focuses on grades 6-12)
Linda Sheffield, Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) are critical to our position as a global leader. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) stress rigor, depth, clarity, and coherence, but fall short of meeting the needs of gifted and talented students. Participants will explore the CCSS in mathematics and research-based strategies, innovation, curriculum, and resources for serving diverse, promising STEM students. Participants will choose from roundtable groups as they actively investigate approaches to support and develop STEM students in grades 6-12, and discuss current issues and implications of national initiatives with STEM experts.

T13. Untethered Learning Through the Use of Technology and Curricular Design
Kristina Ayers Paul, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC; Jann Leppien, University of Great Falls, Great Falls, MT; Jennifer Troester, O’Neill Public Schools, O’Neill, NE

Educators and administrators in gifted education face the challenge of providing learning experiences for students and teachers who are stationed throughout a building, district, or even region. Several technology tools, when married with principles of sound instructional design, can untether learning opportunities from the obstacles of place and time. In this two-part session we will introduce technology solutions for providing educational experiences at a distance, discuss the principles of instructional design that must be considered when designing technology-based learning, and provide time for guided practice using one or more of the tools discussed.

T14. Connections: Preparing for the Next 25 Years in Gifted Education
George Betts, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Blanche Kapushion, Jefferson County Public Schools, Golden, CO

What if a new approach to gifted education were to be formed by educators, administrators, and parents with students as the central focus and as the leaders of this new programming? The result would be a collaborative approach with gifted learners as active participants in helping to determine and direct their learning. Components of this learner-centered approach include definitions, formal and informal identification, RtI, appropriate placement, programming, and assessment. Learn about this model and begin applying apply it as soon as you return home. 

T15. Reaching a Higher Level through Personalized Learning
Marcia Wall, Coeur d’Alene, ID

High-performing students with more eclectic interests may require different forms of instruction than typical school curricula offers. Students often long for some control over their learning. Extended Learning Internships combine research, goal setting, and a mentor connection that takes the depth of the experience beyond fulfilling learning goals. Structuring programs that give students freedom while guiding them through their learning can be tricky. This session provides a detailed framework and materials to create an independent study mentorship class that can work in small and large school settings.

T16. Total School Cluster Grouping: Connecting Elementary Programming to Middle Grades
Marcia Gentry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Total School Cluster Grouping (TSCG),which focuses on differentiation and flexible grouping, provides full-time services to gifted students and benefits all students and teachers in the school. Research on TSCG has shown that student achievement increases, teachers widely implement gifted education strategies with all students, more students are identified as high achieving, and fewer students are identified as low-achieving (including students from economically disadvantaged families and diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds). Participants will learn to about TSCG and leave with resources and tools to create staff and community buy-in, which are essential to a strong program. 

T17. Implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model
Sally Reis, Joseph Renzulli, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 

This session summarizes research and practice on The Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM) and specific strategies for implementing a model that is used in thousands of schools across the world. The model, based on four decades of research, practice, and development, is a comprehensive system for infusing “high-end learning” into total school enrichment efforts while simultaneously challenging gifted and talented students. The SEM has, at its core, 21st century skills such as critical and creative-problem skills as well as creative productivity, inventiveness, and innovation.

T18. Lifelines! Differentiation with Biography
Ann Robinson, Merve Topak Jamsran, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Mary Kathryn Stein, Arkansas Department of Education, Little Rock, AR 

Teachers need lifelines to keep afloat in a busy classroom! The Common Core calls for more non-fiction reading. The NAGC Pre-K-Grade 12 Standards specifically note that biography meets the needs of gifted students for culturally relevant instruction and career exploration. Whether you teach art, science, history, music or math, there are high-interest, creative biographies you can use to differentiate any curriculum unit. Review exemplary biographies and teaching guides for grades K-8. Master the steps for creating your own guide, a Blueprint for Biography, for your favorite children’s biography. Take home a bibliography of recommended biographies. Make biography your lifeline to differentiation. 

T19. Rigor, Relevancy & Relationships: Developing and Maintaining Engagement of High Potential, Culturally Diverse Middle and High School Students
Joy Lawson Davis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA

The goal of increasing access and representation of African American, Hispanic, and other culturally diverse students in gifted and advanced learner programs is coupled with the challenge of student retention in these programs. This session will provide Evidence-based practices and intellectually engaging instruction that are simultaneously culturally responsive, designed to affirm students’ cultural identity, and increase their self-esteem as scholars. Participants will engage in small-group problem solving based on simulations of middle and high school core content and interdisciplinary instructional environments.

T20. Any Questions?
Stuart Omdal, University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, CO; Kris Haslund, St. Paul Public Schools, St. Paul, MN

Honing your skills in asking questions is vital in moving your students to think at higher levels and keeping them engaged in the learning process. Also important is teaching your students to ask questions about the content and related topics. This can awaken curiosity and help them build connections to other content areas, consider critical issues, expand ideas for further investigations, and help them become independent learners. In this participatory session you will learn about the types of questions that elicit higher levels in both critical and creative thinking and ways to implement them.

T21. U-STARS~PLUS: Recognizing and Responding to Young Children of Promise
Mary Ruth Coleman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC; Jacquelin Medina, Debbie Rothenberg, Colorado Department of Education, Denver, CO

Early recognition and nurturing of children of promise is critical to closing the achievement gap and ensuring equity within gifted education.  U-STARS~PLUS, (Using Science, Talents, and Abilities to Recognize Students ~ Promoting Learning for Underrepresented Students) works with K-3 teachers to create nurturing classrooms, recognize children with high potential, engage families in academic support, improve science instruction, and responds to student strengths with challenging opportunities. U-STARS~PLUS fits within multi-tiered supports and services (RtI) by focusing on nurturing children’s potential and building a body of evidence showing the child’s strengths for formal identification.